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SHOOTING THE LUTES ROUTE
Martha Mavroidi’s horizons are wide and her ideas seems to be boundless. Ian Anderson introduces a talented instrumentalist and singer who deserves international recognition.

Martha Mavroidi
 
Martha Mavroidi (Photo: Judith Burrows)
 
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This month’s issue

Here’s what’s in fRoots, No. 357, March 2013

THE EDITOR’S BOX
Ian Anderson’s comment column.
RANTING AND REELING
Tim Chipping's monthly column.
THE ELUSIVE ETHNOMUSICOLOGIST
Elizabeth Kinder's monthly column.
fROOTS PLAYLIST
Recent stuff we like.
CHARTS & LISTS
Specialist and general roots music album sales and airplay charts. Sample them here
REVIEWS
Our key section reviewing all the latest CDs and more - loads bite the dust. No punches pulled! We’ve got some here for you to read now
ROOTING ABOUT
What's happening: packed pages of festivals, gigs, tours, radio, CDs and all kinds of roots-related stuff. The most you'll find anywhere…
ROOT SALAD
A cross-section of featurettes: Anglo-Polish songwriter Katy Carr; a fresh look at Paul Oliver’s blues scholarship; Scottish fiddler Rua McMillan; Denmark’s Himmerland, Marseille’s Fiesta Des Suds; Belgium’s Aurelia, and squeezebox king John Kirkpatrick answering the Rocket Launcher questionnaire.
SHOOTING THE LUTES ROUTE
Martha Mavroidi’s horizons are wide and her ideas seems to be boundless. Ian Anderson introduces a talented instrumentalist and singer who deserves international recognition.
THE UNLIKELY DUO
Stephanie Hladowski & C Joynes made the best English folk record last year, yet nothing in their backgrounds prepared them for it, and they’d only met a few weeks before the recording. Colin Irwin fathoms it out.
CINEMATIC SOUND
Lo’Jo have continued creating highly individual music from their own vision of the planet for three decades. Jamie Renton finds out how it all still works.
THE MORRIS WARS
The person who got the English folk dance movement off the ground was Mary Neal, a suffragette who eventually fell foul of that man Cecil Sharp’s quest for artistic authenticity. Derek Schofield tells the tale.
THE OLD SCHOOL
Malick Pathé Sow & Bao Sissoko make that kind of Senegalese roots music of which Baaba Maal’s Djam Leelii was a classic. Their new one is up there with the best, so Jamie Renton set off on Eurostar pursuit.
SIDES OF THE TWEED
Not that she’s a multi-tasker or anything, but Karen Tweed has been doing a lot of music. Andrew Cronshaw gets her to make a list…
NEW GREEK CITY
Mavrika have delved into their Greek and Cypriot immigrant ancestors’ experiences in London to forge a new city sound from their roots. Elisavet Sotiriadou shares laughs and lunch.
DIGITAL TRADITIONS
In one mighty bound, Topic Records are putting oodles of their back catalogue on line. Colin Irwin investigates.
BIFF!
Our exclusive cartoon strip.
Plus dozens of pages of essential adverts.

 

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