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OUT THERE BEYOND TRAD
Her third solo album Coracle has cemented Emily Portman’s position among the handful of artists and writers who have created their own unique identity. Tim Chipping pours the coffee, Judith Burrows does photos.

Emily Portman
 
Emily Portman (Photo: Judith Burrows)
 
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This month’s issue

Here's what's in the July 2015 issue of fRoots, No. 385
 
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THE EDITOR’S BOX
Ian Anderson’s comment column. Read it here
RANTING AND REELING
Tim Chipping’s monthly column. Read it here
THE ELUSIVE ETHNOMUSICOLOGIST
Elizabeth Kinder’s monthly column. Read it here
fROOTS PLAYLIST
Recent stuff we like.
CHARTS & LISTS
Specialist and general roots music album sales and airplay charts. Sample them here
REVIEWS
Our key section reviewing all the latest CDs and more - loads bite the dust. No punches pulled! We’ve got some here for you to read now
ROOTING ABOUT
What's happening: packed pages of festivals, gigs, tours, radio, CDs and all kinds of roots-related stuff. The most you'll find anywhere…
ROOT SALAD
A cross-section of featurettes: Anglo-Welsh project Beyond The Marches, fascinating English band This Is The Kit, Canadian songwriter Jon Brooks, Estonia’s Torupilli Jussi Trio, a visit to the Essaouira Gnawa Festival, Sephardic singer Françoise Atlan, behind the scenes at Songs From The Shed, and Hollywood’s favourite English folkperson Steve Tilston answering the Rocket Launcher questions.
OUT THERE BEYOND TRAD
Her third solo album Coracle has cemented Emily Portman’s position among the handful of artists and writers who have created their own unique identity. Tim Chipping pours the coffee, Judith Burrows does photos.
WOMADDICTIONS
Go to Womad 2015 and you’re certain to come away with your socks removed by a band you’ve not encountered before. Sarah Coxson points you at our tips for delightment.
THE LAND OF LAU
Little more than a decade ago there wasn’t any music like that which is now being made by quadruple BBC Folk Awards Best Band gongsters Lau. Intrepid Colin Irwin joins the expedition…
NGONI POWERHOUSE
Bassekou Kouyate has almost single-handedly turned a quiet banjo-ancestor into a Malian axe hero’s power tool. Liam Thompson hears how.
WIND OF CHANGE
Le Vent Du Nord are a major force in keeping Québécoise traditional music alive and evolving. Tony Montague puts on his thermals…
INTERNATIONAL TIMES
Local music from out there, right here in the UK. Jamie Renton rounds up music from all over that you can find – and book – on your doorstep.
QUANTOCKOPHENIA
Like Hogwarts crossed with Cecil Sharp House, Halsway Manor is one of the undiscovered – but thriving – treasures of folk music life in England. Steve Hunt pays a visit as they celebrate 50 years as National Centre for Folk Arts.
FOLKIE APOCALYPSE
It’s 1962 and the British folk club movement has hauled itself out of the skiffle cellars. In the second of a three-parter on the ’50s & ’60s scene, Colin Irwin rifles the pages of the music press for the story from 1962 to 1964.
BIFF!
Our exclusive cartoon strip.
Plus dozens of pages of essential adverts.

 

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